ACTIVITIES TO BUILD SYLLABICATION SKILLS

Below I suggest some activities to build syllabication skills at home.  Syllabication skills are a component of phonological awareness.

The examples and activities I present are geared for children in pre-K to first grade.  While these activities can be used with beginning readers, they are really designed for pre-emergent and emergent readers who are not reading at all or reading only a few words.

Key piece of information: When letters are placed within the symbol /   /, it indicates the spoken form of the word.  Since the goal is to build phonological awareness, we are only working with the spoken word.

Examples of Syllabication Skills

1.  What is the first syllable in the word baseball?  base

What is the second syllable in the word baseball?  ball

What is the first syllable in the word opposite? /op/

What is the second syllable in the word opposite? /po/

What is the third syllable in the word opposite? /zit/

2.  How many syllables does the word rich have? 1

How many syllables does the word ocean have? 2

How many syllables does the word mistaken have? 3

3.  The starting word is cupcake.  If I take away the syllable /cup/, what syllable am I left with? /cake/

The starting word is cupcake.  If I take away the syllable /cake/, what syllable am I left with? /cup/

Activities to Build Syllabication Skills

1.  There are 2 ways to teach your child to understand, see and feel a syllable.  Practice saying individual words in front of the mirror.  Speak slowly and exaggerate the syllables.  Each time your mouth opens, it is syllable.  The second way is to touch the underside of your chin.  Each time your chin drops down, it is a syllable.

2.  Play what I call the “Syllabication Name Game.”  Place 5 or more photos of family members or friends on the table.  The number of syllables in the people’s names should be varied.  Ask you child to tell you all of the people’s names (simply to make sure he knows them readily).  There are many variations of this game:

a)  Clap out, jump out or drum out (whatever kinesthetic activity engages your child) the syllables of each person’s name.

b)  Have a handful of “markers” on hand.  These could be coins, cheerios, stickers, anything to count with.  On a piece of paper or a white board, make four horizontally-connected boxes.  One by one, go through the people’s names and place a marker in each box from left to right as you hear each syllable in the name.  For example: Debbie, 2 syllables and therefore 2 markers; Mark, 1 syllable and 1 marker; Violet, 3 syllables and 3 markers; Penelope, 4 syllables and 4 markers.

c)  Sort people’s names according to how many syllables are in their names.  Have a pile of 1 syllable names, 2 syllable names, and so forth.

d)  Provide only the first syllable of people’s names and have your child guess the full name.  You could also provide only the last syllable and have your child guess the full name, which would be more difficult.

** You can do this game with words, other than names.  If your child is really interested in baseball, the words could be pitcher, baseball, strike, catch and overhand.

** All variations of this game are meant to be done with the spoken word.  There is no need for print.  However, if your child finds the game too easy and is a beginning reader, you may use the written words.

3.  Label post-it notes with the numbers 1, 2 or 3.  The 1, 2 or 3 stand for the number of syllables within a word.  Have your child stick the correctly numbered post-it note on objects within your home.  For example, bed, chair and book would get 1s, printer, bathtub and flashlight would get 2s, computer, bicycle and camera would get 3s.

4.  Try clapping or stomping or jumping or banging out every syllable in common songs, such as Mary Had a Little Lamb or Twinkle, Twinkle.  Both of these songs have a balanced mixture of syllables.

 

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  1. […] awareness in your home, on a walk, in the car, etc.  Click here to learn more about Rhyming, Syllabication and Onset-Rime and recommended activities to promote phonological […]

  2. […] about sounds, especially if you incorporate phonological awareness activities, such as rhyming and syllabication, and phonemic awareness activities into your everyday life.  But at some point, your child is […]

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